1. Executive Sponsorship
Getting executive buy-in shouldn’t be a problem: A Unified UX can reduce costs, speed time to market and drive revenues from growth in adoption. Often, you’ll get this support from the CTO or VP of development, but you could go as high as the CEO.
2. UI Elements Design System
Say goodbye to the hundred-page style guide. This is the “what” of your design—the buttons, form elements, content blocks, etc.—and you should share it with developers in a working tool, like Sketch, Figma or UX Pin. It’s more efficient for everyone.
3. Unified UX Design Guide
Say goodbye to the hundred-page style guide. This is the “what” of your design—the buttons, form elements, content blocks, etc.—and you should share it with designers in a working tool, like Sketch, Figma or UX Pin. It’s more efficient for everyone.
4. UI Technology Strategy
Whether you’re building brand new solutions using a single technology—like responsive HTML and JavaScript—or dealing with legacy applications built with multiple technologies, you’ll need to create a strategy to help achieve a unified experience across them.
5. Coded Reference Application
This is a working model of the coded UI and a reference point for development teams. It contains the reusable code they’ll use to build out other apps across the portfolio or devices.
6. Unified UX Methodology and Training
Building a house? You wouldn’t install the plumbing before you pour the foundation. It’s the same with your UX. There’s a process, and everyone needs to be on the same page with a clear roadmap and timeline for key deliverables.
7. Governance Policy and Review
Different platforms have different design requirements, and you’ll have to decide which you’ll target. Have your product team do a simple 30-minute review at the end of each 2-week sprint to provide guidance and support.
8. Production Application
Congrats! You have a working app, released to users. If you implemented your Unified UX right, they’re having an amazing experience. (And if you missed a few things, don’t worry—we’ll get to that in step 10.)
9. Reusable UI Code Library
Tossing aside the paper style guide and opting for a reusable library provides consistency, reduces development time and allows teams to deliver greater functionality—even if you don’t have highly skilled UI development capabilities.
10. Semi-Annual Updates
A Unified UX design system is a living, evolving thing—and product teams will always find room for improvement. Tell them their good ideas can be incorporated into the next semi-annual update and they’ll be happy to keep using the current version.
The Catalyst Unified UX approach helps you ensure consistency across your entire family of digital solutions as well as across devices.